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Höstens gästföreläsningar på YBC

skickad 15 aug. 2010 13:27 av Daniel Lundqvist   [ uppdaterad 16 aug. 2010 23:30 av Emma Rosén ]
Vi har ett mycket intressant gästföreläsningsprogram på YBC
denna termin. Nedan följer några namn som redan är inbokade.
Fler tillkommer under terminen
  /Daniel

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Teo Hären
24 Aug kl 9:00

YBC torget plan 4

Presentation kommer








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Hans Rosling
6 Okt kl 18:30

(lokal meddelas senare)

Presentation kommer






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Troed Troedsson
Tid o lokal ej spikat

Presentation kommer







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Steven Nadler
28 Sept - 1 Okt
YBC torget

Presentation se nedan






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Scott Altran
Ons 11 Okt

YBC torget


Presentation se nedan








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Steven Nadler
On 28 September to 1 October 2010, Steven Nadler  will give a general lecture on moral philosophy and then teach a 4-day mini course. This course will be an introduction to ethics and moral philosophy.  It will consider a number of major moral philosophies from the history of philosophy, from antiquity to modern times, and see what they have to say on what is right action and what it is to be a good person, as well how they propose we address various ethical problems.  For reading, the focus will be mainly on some dialogues of Plato, and especially Socrates' conception of the "examined life" and of what it means to flourish as a human being.

Steven received his PhD from Columbia University and currently is the Chairman of the Department of Philosophy and Max and Frieda Weinstein-Bascom Professor of Jewish Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  He is the author of books on Spinoza, including Spinoza: A Life.  His research focuses on seventeenth-century philosophy and the antecedents to aspects of modern thought in Medieval Latin and Jewish philosophy - including the problem of evil, and is the author/editor of 12 books within his field of study.

Lecture co-Sponsor:  Carpe Vitam Foundation

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Scott Atran
On 11 November 2010, Scott Atran  will give a 90-minute morning lecture on what motivates participation in violent political action, such as al Qaeda, and then have an afternoon interactive classroom session (Time permitting, he will have another classroom session on 12 November).  Scott is an anthropologist specializing in conflict resolution and is the author of the new book Talking to the Enemy, due to be released October 2010.  Just recently, in March 2010, Scott testified before the U.S. Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities, advocating a field-based social understanding of terrorists’ motivation, as an alternative approach to conflict resolution.

Scott received his PhD in anthropology from Columbia University.  He has taught at Cambridge University, Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes in Paris.  He is currently a research director in anthropology at the of the French Centre national de la recherche scientifique and member of the Jean Nicod Institute at the École Normale Supérieure.  He is also visiting professor of psychology and public policy at the University of Michigan, and presidential scholar in sociology at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City.

He has experimented extensively on the ways scientists and ordinary people categorize and reason  about nature, on the cognitive and evolutionary psychology of religion, and on the limits of rational choice in political and cultural conflict.  His work has been widely published internationally in the popular press, and in scientific journals in a variety of disciplines.  He has briefed members of the U.S. Congress and the National Security Council staff at the White House on the The Devoted Actor versus the Rational Actor in Managing World Conflict, on the Comparative Anatomy and Evolution of Global Network Terrorism, and on Pathways to and from Violent Extremism.  He was an early critic of U.S. intervention in Iraq and of deepening involvement in Afghanistan, and he has been engaged in conflict negotiations in the Middle East.

Scott has authored 50 articles on political conflict and violence and on terrorism, as well as 32 scientific articles, and is a frequent contributor to the New York Times editorial pages.

Lecture co-Sponsor:  Carpe Vitam Foundation
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